Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)


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05/08/2013

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Self Deception Philosophy

Start your review of Self-Deception Unmasked. Sep 02, Tim rated it really liked it Shelves: , nonfiction , philosophy , psychology. Short but interesting philosophical investigation into the possibility as to whether people can willingly pull the wool down over their eyes as opposed to merely being mistaken in their beliefs. The author breaks self-deception down into two types which he refers to as the straight version and the twisted version. The straight form occurs when we believe something because we want it to be true and the twisted version occurs when we believe something even though we want it to be false.

The first part of the book examines the way that a desired conclusion has the potential to alter the way we evaluate information. The role of emotions in introducing bias into our thinking is also considered. One of the factors the author examines is something he calls the confidence threshold. One might assume that when evaluating the pros and cons of any particular position, we start with the assumption that there is a fifty percent chance that it is true and a fifty percent chance that it is false.

We inhabit a neutral middle ground where we can dispassionately look at all the information available to us. If we were machines this might be the case. The author argues for the position that people do not knowingly deceive themselves, what he refers to a nonagency as opposed to an agency view.

Though he spends an entire chapter dismantling arguments that people do willingly and consciously deceive themselves, at the end of the book I still found myself less than convinced. It seems to me if you are heavily invested in something — a relationship, for example — you might intentionally overlook things that an impartial observer would not.

All of the examples the author uses in this book deal with interpersonal relationships but one could apply the concepts and explanations outlined here in any situation where opposing points of view have to be assessed. It's a good idea to hold our assumptions, inclinations, and beliefs up to the light every now and then to turn them this way and that and see how they hold up. After all, none of us were born with a perfect understanding of life and none of us have a perfect understanding of it now. As Muhammad Ali once said: 'The man who views the world at 50 the same as he did at 20 has wasted 30 years of his life.

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It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders. Continue the series. See more. Public Goods, Private Goods. Raymond Geuss. Much political thinking today, particularly that influenced by liberalism, assumes a clear distinction between the public and the private, and holds that the correct understanding of this should weigh heavily in our attitude to human goods.

It is, for instance, widely held that the state may address human action in the ''public'' realm but not in the ''private.

Drawing on a series of colorful examples from the ancient world, he illustrates some of the many ways in which actions can in fact be understood as public or private. Welfare and Rational Care. Stephen Darwall. What kind of life best ensures human welfare? Since the ancient Greeks, this question has been as central to ethical philosophy as to ordinary reflection. But what exactly is welfare? This question has suffered from relative neglect. And, as Stephen Darwall shows, it has done so at a price. Presenting a provocative new "rational care theory of welfare," Darwall proves that a proper understanding of welfare fundamentally changes how we think about what is best for people.

A Defense of Hume on Miracles. Robert J.

Self Deception is Necessary and Delightful - Leah Savion - TEDxIndianaUniversity

Since its publication in the mid-eighteenth century, Hume's discussion of miracles has been the target of severe and often ill-tempered attacks. In this book, one of our leading historians of philosophy offers a systematic response to these attacks. Physicalism, or Something Near Enough. Jaegwon Kim. Contemporary discussions in philosophy of mind have largely been shaped by physicalism, the doctrine that all phenomena are ultimately physical.

Here, Jaegwon Kim presents the most comprehensive and systematic presentation yet of his influential ideas on the mind-body problem.

He seeks to determine, after half a century of debate: What kind of or "how much" physicalism can we lay claim to? He begins by laying out mental causation and consciousness as the two principal challenges to contemporary physicalism. How can minds exercise their causal powers in a physical world?

Is a physicalist account of consciousness possible? According to Kim, then, while physicalism is not the whole truth, it is the truth near enough. Philosophical Myths of the Fall. Stephen Mulhall. Did post-Enlightenment philosophers reject the idea of original sin and hence the view that life is a quest for redemption from it?

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In Philosophical Myths of the Fall, Stephen Mulhall identifies and evaluates a surprising ethical-religious dimension in the work of three highly influential philosophers--Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Wittgenstein. He asks: Is the Christian idea of humanity as structurally flawed something that these three thinkers aim simply to criticize?

Or do they, rather, end up by reproducing secular variants of the same mythology? Similar ebooks. Subjects: Self-deception ; Leadership. Source: Christian Education Journal, 16 no 2 Aug , p Subjects: Bible. James ; Self-deception ; Faith -- Biblical teaching. Source: Criswell Theological Review, 8 no 2 Spr , p Source: Philosophy East and West, 66 no 1 Jan , p Source: Studies in Spirituality, 25 , p Source: Asian Philosophy, 8 no 2 Jul , p Source: Journal of Religious Ethics, 37 no 2 Jun , p Source: Journal for Preachers, 25 no 2 Lent , p Source: Heythrop Journal, 55 no 5 Sep , p Subjects: Self-deception ; Faith.

Subjects: Addiction ; Compulsive behavior ; Drug abuse.

SWBTS Libraries

Source: First Things, Feb , p Source: Church History, 63 no 4 Dec , p Source: Religious Studies, 52 no 3 Sep , p Dewi Zephaniah ; Ramal, Randy Peer reviewed. Subjects: Mythomania ; Self-deception ; Deception. Mar, Vol. Source: Behavioral Ecology.

Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)
Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy) Self-Deception Unmasked (Princeton Monographs in Philosophy)

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